Wednesday, 18 October 2017

The Potency of Exclusive Breastfeeding

Exclusive breastfeeding means that the infant receives only breastmilk. No other liquid is given to the baby, not even water or solids are given.- with the exception of oral rehydration solutons or drops or syrups of vitamins, minerals or medicines.



Exclusive breastfeeding has many benefits for both mothers and the infants. breast milk contains all the nutrients an infant needs to grow in the first six months of life. Breast milk protects against diarrhea and other common child illnesses and many other health long term benfits for the mother and the child. here is a run down of the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding.

  • Exclusive breastfeeding ensures optimal growth and developments
  • It protects from unnecessary illnesses
  • The child grows stronger and more healthy
  • It ensures that the child grows intelligently and smartly. that is a high IQ
  • Has the tendency of reducing obesity and overweight in children and adolescents
  • A lower risk of gastrointestinal infection
  • Rapid maternal weight loss
  • Corrects all delays with menstrual return
  • It provides perfect mix of vitamins and everything your baby needs to grow
  • Lowers your baby's risk of having asthma or allergies
  • Fewer ear infections, respiratory illnesses for babies exclusively breast-fed

TIPS ON BABY FEEDING

Here are important tips on feeding to guide you to feed right so that your baby can have the important nutrients for general growth.



· No matter what, never give your newborn water, juice or other fluids except breast milk or formula where breastfeeding is not possible.

· Feed the newborn on demand. It is estimated that they need food every two hours on the average, that about ten to twelve times a day.

· Vitamin D is an essential vitamin in the growth of the baby. Ask your doctor on how to go about the supplement.

· When the baby closes her eyes and starts to spit out the nipple, know that the baby has had enough of the feeding. It’s a sign you should stop.

· Never use food to pacify. When the baby is full, you can use other methods like rocking and singing to pacify the baby.

· The first year of the baby is largely characterized by breastfeeding, but after the first six  months, you begin to put solid food in perspective so she can start learning how to eat solid food.

· While you are feeding the baby, please take note of the weight. Check with the doctor because it is expected that newborns will double their weight after the first four months and triple it after the first year. Check with the doctor so as not to exceed the guidelines.


· Gentle but consistent routines are great for better eating habits.

· When you start giving them formula, it is very important that you evaluate the formula. Just because it came out of a factory does not mean it is good to use. Be watchful for the sugar source and content. If it a corn syrup source, then it is not so great, but if it from a brown rice source, that is better. Unnecessary ingredients are not needed.

· The feeding bottle should also be checked. If it is plastic, the best are those that are BPA free. Check the label, or better yet, use glass.

· When you’re feeding with bottle, please make sure the baby is propped up at a good angle so that you don’t overwhelm the baby with fluid.  

· The baby might want to suck a full bottle in one gulp, so be careful with the amount she is swallowing.

· Cuddle the baby and get cozy with her. This tends to improve the bonding.

· Switch sides when feeding the baby.

· Use high quality water. Test the water for leads if you are living in an older apartment. One good trick is to allow the water flow for a while before fetching.
· Never use microwave to warm baby food.

· As she poops, please watch it and examine carefully. Watch for signs of intestinal distress, for instance a bloated belly.

· It is said that hunger is a late sign, it is very pertinent to know signs when she is hungry like licking his lips, sucking at hands, feet, tongue or clothes, turning heads frantically, mouth opening and closing  e.t.c.


culled from 'The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg


RELATED ARTICLES










THE BEST WAY TO STORE BREAST-MILK



You can store your breast-milk in a number of ways. It is very important that you keep it fresh so the baby can enjoy it.
This method is necessary if you are not taking your baby to your work place or when you are going out. It is important so that your baby can continue to get the nutritional benefits of breast-milk. This will also keep your milk supply flowing.
The tips include;

· Keep it at room temperature of 25 degrees Celsius and no more than six hours.

· In a cool box with ice packs or blocks for up to twenty hours.

· In a refrigerator at 4 degrees Celsius or colder and for up to five days. Store it away from meat and other uncooked foods. This is to avoid being contaminated with the smell of those of foods.

· In the compartment of a freezer for up to two weeks.

· You can add new breast-milk to the one in the freezer so long as it was stored or milk on the same day.

· Always sterilize your containers so your baby can always get good quality and healthy breast-milk.

· Wash your hands thoroughly before milking your breast and keep everything as clean as possible.

· Lest you forget, always label your containers with the right dates so that you don’t get confused.

· Use the first in, first out method.

· Your breast nozzle should always be kept clean.

· You can freeze your milk, but when doing so, keep a little space or a gap at the top of the container. It is common for the breast milk to expand and occupy space when frozen.

· Please never use microwave to defrost your frozen breast-milk, if you do that, it is no longer breast milk. Always defrost it under normal cold temperature.

culled from 'The Pregnant Mom' - http://amzn.to/2gOygOg

RELATED ARTICLES




Sunday, 15 October 2017

7 SIGNS YOUR CHILD IS GIFTED

Did you hear what he just said?" Many parents see every word their child utters or every squiggle he
draws as evidence of his being gifted. Though most children aren't identified as gifted until they begin school, some show signs of being gifted at a very early age.
Gifted child Ben Hellerstein of Larchmont, New York, for instance, was actually reading nonfiction books and memorizing facts by the age of 4. His mother wishes she had realized that he was academically advanced at that time. "If I had," she says, "he could have gotten the help he needed in school earlier than he did, and his first year of school wouldn't have been so unhappy."
Ben's mom learned what many educators know: Identifying a child as gifted isn't about gaining bragging rights, it's about getting your child the education that best suits his needs.

Signs of giftedness in a preschooler
Your 2- to 4-year-old may be gifted if she has some of these characteristics:
  • Has a specific talent, such as artistic ability or an unusual ease with numbers. For example, children who draw unusually realistic pictures or who can manipulate numbers in their head may be gifted.
  • Reaches developmental milestones well ahead of peers.
  • Has advanced language development, such as an extensive vocabulary or the ability to speak insentences much earlier than other children of the same age.
  • Is relentlessly curious and never seems to stop asking questions.
  • Is unusually active (though not hyperactive). While hyperactive children often have a short attention span, gifted children can concentrate on one task for long periods of time, are passionate about their interests, and like to be challenged by difficult activities.
  • Has a vivid imagination. Gifted children often create a vast and intricate network of imaginary friends with whom they become very involved.
  • Is able to memorize facts easily and can recall arcane information learned from television shows, movies, or books.


Other signs of giftedness may be a little harder to discern. Some gifted children realize that they are
"different" from their peers. This can make them feel isolated and withdrawn. It may also make them
likely targets for bullying.
They may begin to experience intense frustration because they can think more rapidly than they can
express themselves, verbally or physically. If your child appears unusually angry or frustrated, you may want to consult a mental health professional.

Testing your preschooler for giftedness Although you may want to know if your preschooler is gifted, most children don't need to be tested for giftedness before entering elementary school. However, consultations with a mental health professional may be appropriate if your preschooler appears to be unusually bored in school or shows signs of emotional or social problems, such as severe worry or anxiety, refusal to take part in school or other activities, or persistent nightmares.
If your child is enrolled in preschool, speak to the teacher or school director to find out whether the
school is affiliated with any mental health professionals who specialize in working with gifted children.

If your child isn't in school or the school isn't receptive to your concerns, ask your child's doctor to refer you to a child psychologist who conducts tests for giftedness. Private testing can be expensive – several hundred dollars or more. Check with your insurance plan to see whether your policy covers the cost.

Children as young as 3 can be given IQ and ability tests. Children whose IQ scores are at or above 130 are usually considered gifted (the range for average intelligence is 85 to 115). Sometimes a child with an IQ score of 120 will qualify for a gifted class.

Today, IQ is often just one factor among many that are looked at before a child is considered gifted.
Often parents and teachers will be asked to write their impressions of a child, and this input is
considered along with test results.

When giftedness is hard to diagnose
You might be surprised to learn that a child can be both gifted and learning disabled. In most cases, the disability is recognized while giftedness goes undetected. Giftedness in children from ethnic minorities and disadvantaged backgrounds, and those who speak English as a second language, is often overlooked as well.
If your child falls into any of these categories, it's best to find a psychologist who is sensitive to these
issues. It is also important to ask your child's teacher to observe him and look for talents that
conventional tests cannot detect.


RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg



RELATED ARTICLES



Wednesday, 4 October 2017

TAMING FEARS IN YOUR BABIES

Most preschoolers go through a fearful phase. Sometimes fears are short-lived — for example, a new loud vacuum. Other fears seem to spring from nowhere and stick around. And some children have temperaments that make them more prone to fears than others. The general rule is to treat the fear respectfully. After all, it's very real to your child. Then look for child-centered ways (as opposed to adult-level logic) to provide reassurance. 


A lively imagination often gives temporary birth to monsters, dragons, ghosts, and other mysterious
creatures of the dark. Fear of the dark is common as a child's mind becomes capable of inventing its
own stories. (You can actually think of night fears — the result of an overactive imagination — as a
sophisticated cognitive development.)

To help calm your child:

  • Take the fear seriously. Never belittle it or make fun of your child's fantasy.
  • Skip the logic. A patient explanation that there's no way a monster could live in the closet but only at night won't wash.



  • Look at the room from your child's viewpoint. Maybe there's a weird shadow that really does look like a spiderweb.



  • Try some light. The reassuring glow of a nightlight or a light in the hallway has vanquished many a scary creature.



  • Give a little extra TLC. Often fears reflect some other anxiety in your child's life; she might just want some hugs and snuggles. A happy and secure bedtime routine before your child is tucked in is important, too.

GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg




RELATED ARTICLES



Thursday, 21 September 2017

BRINGING OUT THE BEST FROM YOUR 4 YEAR OLD CHILD

Wow, 4 years old already?! If 3-year-olds are busy, inquisitive, and fun, 4-year-olds are all that, magnified — yet with a budding maturity, self-control, and understanding of rules that help make life a bit calmer. sociability is a hallmark of this age. Wariness around new people wanes, and your child will likely enjoy making friends and playing with them. 


Welcome to a year that's full of building on old skills while picking up brand-new ones at breakneck speed. Four is typically a lively, energetic, and sociable year. Confident about basics like speaking, running, drawing, and building things, your child is ready to use these skills to the fullest. Even more reserved 4-year-olds tend to enjoy the company of adults and children of all ages, from the smallest babies (next to whom they feel "so big") to the oldest great-grandparents (with whom they can often connect on the simple level of enjoying a moment together). Everybody seems fascinating now, from the mail carrier to cousins to random new faces on the playground.


GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg



RELATED ARTICLES



Saturday, 2 September 2017

ENHANCING YOUR CHILD'S IMAGINATION

A profound difference between 3-year-olds and younger kids is the blossoming of their imagination now. Three-year-olds are keen observers of the world around them, and creative play is the way they rehearse and absorb all those new ideas. A 3-year-old's mind becomes capable of seeing an object as more than one thing: A stick can also be transformed into a sword, a magic wand, or a baby. 

What's one of the all-time best gifts you could give your child? A box. Seriously! A large carton can become a spaceship, a grocery store, a car, a house. It can provide more hours of emotional, intellectual, and social stimulation than any fancy electronic toy.

Pretend play becomes more complex and interactive at 3. It's no accident that preschools have plenty of props — plastic tools, kitchen gear, blocks, dress-up clothes — for kids to pretend with.
Children learn by doing and imagining. When they pretend they're a police officer or parent, they have the freedom to explore at their own pace a world they're learning to navigate. They hold the power. They can express their emotions, punishing their pretend children as they've been punished. They learn to negotiate and solve problems (how to stop the bad guy or what to cook for dinner). They learn to walk in others' shoes, helping to develop empathy.

Creating stories about pretend characters encourages language development and abstract thinking. And being able to see that a belt could be a lasso or a block could be an iPod is a precursor to realizing that those symbols on the page are actually letters and words.
To encourage imaginary play, have a stash of props handy for your children to explore: boxes, clothes, shoes, household utensils, blocks, stuffed animals, and writing materials. Then step back and have fun watching what the props become.


GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg

RELATED ARTICLES



Thursday, 3 August 2017

Enhancing the speech of your children

The charming speech — and kooky mistakes — of the typical 3-year-old are a wonder to behold. Sometimes their silly sentences and words are accidental ("It was gigantormous!"). Sometimes your little linguist will concoct wild words just because they're so much fun to say ("I'm making gorgorolla mud pancakes for you!"). This evidence of your child's growing proficiency with the English language should be music to your ears! 


What sounds like nonsense coming from your preschooler's lips is actually a sophisticated kind of language experimentation. He might call his little brother a "pootie" or say, "Look at that prettyful flower." He may call a fountain a "crash water," an invented term that's really pretty clear. These creative concoctions crop up more often as he develops better language skills.
Now that he knows how words are supposed to sound and how sentences are supposed to be put together, he begins to play around with new combinations. "There's a wacky macrackey who lives under my pillow." This wordplay — often combining real and nonsense words — is a lot of fun for preschoolers.

They'll try to make you laugh as they dream up better material. Play along with them and invent some of your own. Instead of serving macaroni and cheese for dinner, set "pumpkin blooey" in front of them.

All these manipulations of sounds and words now will give your child a leg up as he learns to read. (And if you haven't introduced Dr. Seuss's silly wordplay yet, do!)
GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg



RELATED ARTICLES



Monday, 31 July 2017

Developing the gift of coordination in your children

Around the age of 3, you'll start noticing that some kids are more naturally athletic than others. You might know a 3-year-old who can catch a football or kick a ball with precision while another may fumble around. Plus: The book club that could save your sanity. 

If your child can't do some physical things that her peers can, should you worry? Probably not. Coordination not only takes time, it's also very individual. Some kids are more coordinated than others from an early age and remain that way all their life. Others seem destined to earn the nickname Butterfingers, although of course they'll never hear it cross your lips. Temperament plays a role here, too. Some children are risk takers from the start, while others prefer to watch until they're comfortable trying physical feats.

The basic physical milestones a child should reach by age 4 include:
Holding a crayon between thumb and fingers (rather than clutched in the fist)Pouring from a pitcher to a glass or cupUsing utensils to eatThrowing overhand (not accurately — simply being able to coordinate this motion)Hopping in place on one footStacking eight or more blocks in a tower
Always mention your concerns about development to your child's doctor. Your hunches about your child are important because you see her more and know her better than anyone.

GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg



RELATED ARTICLES



Thursday, 27 July 2017

Developing your child's writing skills

Don't panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn't even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child's progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally. 



It's exciting when your child's scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don't stress out if your child isn't even interested in writing.
A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it's still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an "x."

Regardless of where your child is on the spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.

Don't panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn't even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child's progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally. 

It's exciting when your child's scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don't stress out if your child isn't even interested in writing.
A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it's still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an "x."

Regardless of where your child is on the spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.
Don't panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn't even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child's progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally. 
t's exciting when your child's scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don't stress out if your child isn't even interested in writing.
A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it's still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an "x."
Regardless of where your child is on the spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.

GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg


RELATED ARTICLES