Wednesday, 4 October 2017

TAMING FEARS IN YOUR BABIES

Most preschoolers go through a fearful phase. Sometimes fears are short-lived — for example, a new loud vacuum. Other fears seem to spring from nowhere and stick around. And some children have temperaments that make them more prone to fears than others. The general rule is to treat the fear respectfully. After all, it's very real to your child. Then look for child-centered ways (as opposed to adult-level logic) to provide reassurance. 


A lively imagination often gives temporary birth to monsters, dragons, ghosts, and other mysterious
creatures of the dark. Fear of the dark is common as a child's mind becomes capable of inventing its
own stories. (You can actually think of night fears — the result of an overactive imagination — as a
sophisticated cognitive development.)

To help calm your child:

  • Take the fear seriously. Never belittle it or make fun of your child's fantasy.
  • Skip the logic. A patient explanation that there's no way a monster could live in the closet but only at night won't wash.



  • Look at the room from your child's viewpoint. Maybe there's a weird shadow that really does look like a spiderweb.



  • Try some light. The reassuring glow of a nightlight or a light in the hallway has vanquished many a scary creature.



  • Give a little extra TLC. Often fears reflect some other anxiety in your child's life; she might just want some hugs and snuggles. A happy and secure bedtime routine before your child is tucked in is important, too.

GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg




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Thursday, 21 September 2017

BRINGING OUT THE BEST FROM YOUR 4 YEAR OLD CHILD

Wow, 4 years old already?! If 3-year-olds are busy, inquisitive, and fun, 4-year-olds are all that, magnified — yet with a budding maturity, self-control, and understanding of rules that help make life a bit calmer. sociability is a hallmark of this age. Wariness around new people wanes, and your child will likely enjoy making friends and playing with them. 


Welcome to a year that's full of building on old skills while picking up brand-new ones at breakneck speed. Four is typically a lively, energetic, and sociable year. Confident about basics like speaking, running, drawing, and building things, your child is ready to use these skills to the fullest. Even more reserved 4-year-olds tend to enjoy the company of adults and children of all ages, from the smallest babies (next to whom they feel "so big") to the oldest great-grandparents (with whom they can often connect on the simple level of enjoying a moment together). Everybody seems fascinating now, from the mail carrier to cousins to random new faces on the playground.


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The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg



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Saturday, 2 September 2017

ENHANCING YOUR CHILD'S IMAGINATION

A profound difference between 3-year-olds and younger kids is the blossoming of their imagination now. Three-year-olds are keen observers of the world around them, and creative play is the way they rehearse and absorb all those new ideas. A 3-year-old's mind becomes capable of seeing an object as more than one thing: A stick can also be transformed into a sword, a magic wand, or a baby. 

What's one of the all-time best gifts you could give your child? A box. Seriously! A large carton can become a spaceship, a grocery store, a car, a house. It can provide more hours of emotional, intellectual, and social stimulation than any fancy electronic toy.

Pretend play becomes more complex and interactive at 3. It's no accident that preschools have plenty of props — plastic tools, kitchen gear, blocks, dress-up clothes — for kids to pretend with.
Children learn by doing and imagining. When they pretend they're a police officer or parent, they have the freedom to explore at their own pace a world they're learning to navigate. They hold the power. They can express their emotions, punishing their pretend children as they've been punished. They learn to negotiate and solve problems (how to stop the bad guy or what to cook for dinner). They learn to walk in others' shoes, helping to develop empathy.

Creating stories about pretend characters encourages language development and abstract thinking. And being able to see that a belt could be a lasso or a block could be an iPod is a precursor to realizing that those symbols on the page are actually letters and words.
To encourage imaginary play, have a stash of props handy for your children to explore: boxes, clothes, shoes, household utensils, blocks, stuffed animals, and writing materials. Then step back and have fun watching what the props become.


GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg

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Thursday, 3 August 2017

Enhancing the speech of your children

The charming speech — and kooky mistakes — of the typical 3-year-old are a wonder to behold. Sometimes their silly sentences and words are accidental ("It was gigantormous!"). Sometimes your little linguist will concoct wild words just because they're so much fun to say ("I'm making gorgorolla mud pancakes for you!"). This evidence of your child's growing proficiency with the English language should be music to your ears! 


What sounds like nonsense coming from your preschooler's lips is actually a sophisticated kind of language experimentation. He might call his little brother a "pootie" or say, "Look at that prettyful flower." He may call a fountain a "crash water," an invented term that's really pretty clear. These creative concoctions crop up more often as he develops better language skills.
Now that he knows how words are supposed to sound and how sentences are supposed to be put together, he begins to play around with new combinations. "There's a wacky macrackey who lives under my pillow." This wordplay — often combining real and nonsense words — is a lot of fun for preschoolers.

They'll try to make you laugh as they dream up better material. Play along with them and invent some of your own. Instead of serving macaroni and cheese for dinner, set "pumpkin blooey" in front of them.

All these manipulations of sounds and words now will give your child a leg up as he learns to read. (And if you haven't introduced Dr. Seuss's silly wordplay yet, do!)
GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg



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Monday, 31 July 2017

Developing the gift of coordination in your children

Around the age of 3, you'll start noticing that some kids are more naturally athletic than others. You might know a 3-year-old who can catch a football or kick a ball with precision while another may fumble around. Plus: The book club that could save your sanity. 

If your child can't do some physical things that her peers can, should you worry? Probably not. Coordination not only takes time, it's also very individual. Some kids are more coordinated than others from an early age and remain that way all their life. Others seem destined to earn the nickname Butterfingers, although of course they'll never hear it cross your lips. Temperament plays a role here, too. Some children are risk takers from the start, while others prefer to watch until they're comfortable trying physical feats.

The basic physical milestones a child should reach by age 4 include:
Holding a crayon between thumb and fingers (rather than clutched in the fist)Pouring from a pitcher to a glass or cupUsing utensils to eatThrowing overhand (not accurately — simply being able to coordinate this motion)Hopping in place on one footStacking eight or more blocks in a tower
Always mention your concerns about development to your child's doctor. Your hunches about your child are important because you see her more and know her better than anyone.

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Thursday, 27 July 2017

Developing your child's writing skills

Don't panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn't even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child's progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally. 



It's exciting when your child's scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don't stress out if your child isn't even interested in writing.
A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it's still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an "x."

Regardless of where your child is on the spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.

Don't panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn't even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child's progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally. 

It's exciting when your child's scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don't stress out if your child isn't even interested in writing.
A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it's still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an "x."

Regardless of where your child is on the spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.
Don't panic if you notice some kids at preschool writing their names while your child doesn't even recognize the letter his name starts with. When kids learn to write is highly variable, and this year the spread will widen. Your child's progress depends on gender (girls gain the needed fine motor control sooner), the length of his name (Eli will have an easier time than, say, Zachariah), and what else is going on developmentally. 
t's exciting when your child's scribbles begin to look more like real letters. Some threes even start writing their name, or a few letters of it. But writing is one of those developmental milestones that varies greatly from child to child. Don't stress out if your child isn't even interested in writing.
A lot depends on fine motor development. Your child may have a clear dominant hand by now (or it may not be clear for another year or so). But it's still hard to control a pencil to make letters with diagonal lines (M, N, K). Other letters may not look quite right either. The lines might not connect at the right place, or letters like E may have too many horizontal lines. What kids should be able to do at this age is copy a circle and make an "x."
Regardless of where your child is on the spectrum, encourage his writing by keeping paper, fat pencils, fat crayons, and chalk within easy reach. Another way to pique interest: Pour sand, salt, or sugar onto a tray and show him how to trace letters with a finger.

GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg


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Saturday, 22 July 2017

MAGICAL THINKING OF CHILDREN

Which is real and which is an illusion? Magicians and grownups might know the difference, but your preschooler is just starting to figure it all out. Three year olds famously literal thinkers. If you say someone is "as big as a house," that's exactly what they'll picture. At the same time, they're magical thinkers, quick to assign humanlike abilities to animals or rocks. This is part of what makes this age so much fun.



Learning to distinguish between fantasy and reality is a gradual process. During this year, your child is at an interesting juncture. He still practices what developmental psychologists refer to as "magical thinking," assigning traits to objects or people that are impossible but seem logical to your child's early reasoning abilities.

So, your child might believe that a letter dropped in the mailbox immediately flies right to Grandpa's mailbox. He might think that tigers live in trees, that birds can talk to him, and that there really is a man on the moon. Sometimes things grownups say are taken literally because they sound plausible to your child: "The mosquitoes are eating us alive." "You're killing me!"

At the same time your child is, bit by bit, figuring out that certain flights of fancy probably are not real: His toy airplane doesn't really fly. The Wiggles don't live inside the TV. This process takes years — witness 8-year-old tooth fairy and Santa Claus believers. No rush: It's wonderful to retain a little bit of magical thinking right into adulthood.

GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg


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Wednesday, 19 July 2017

How to tame your baby's tantrums

You made it through the terrible twos. Why didn't anyone warn you about the"tantrummy threes"? Be warned: For many kids, tantrums won't taper off for another year. At 3, your preschooler is trying to cope with an amazingly complicated world. Most tantrums are born out of frustration (she doesn't have the skills to do what she wants to) or disappointment (she has little control over any of the decisions about her day). All you can do is decide how to respond. 



She's 3, but still having tantrums. Although she's older, when she's upset she's every bit as emotionally primitive as she was as a toddler. (And, brace yourself — it's not unusual for occasional tantrums to pop up through the fours and beyond.) When your child is in full-meltdown mode, don't try to reason with her, no matter how advanced her language skills are. Stay calm, even detached. Raised voices and anger only escalate the situation. If you can, ignore her. If you're in public, try to remove her to your car or some other more private, less overwhelming place.

In one important way, handling a tantrum with a 3-year-old is different: Giving in is especially risky at this age because it sets a dangerous precedent — your child is able to remember that pitching a fit can work. For instance, she screams because she doesn't want to pick up her toys so you let it slide, or she flails when she can't have candy in the checkout aisle, so you give in "just this once" to hush her up. If you cave, you teach her that screaming works and that all limits are flexible — probably not the kind of discipline messages you're aiming for.

A great prevention technique: Reward your child when you see her handling frustration or disappointment in a mature way. "Wow, I like how you didn't fuss one bit when I asked you to help pick up the toys on the floor before going outside."

GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg


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Teaching children how to become team players

We live in a sports-saturated culture, no doubt about it. Teams for kids are increasingly available year-round, just about everywhere, for every age — even 3. Exercise helps kids fend off obesity and teaches a love for games, but consider your child's personality and interests when encouraging her to get moving. And timing is everything. Team sports are too much for 3-year-olds but other athletic activities (running, swim play, catch) are terrific. 


Your little one dazzles you with her strong kick and confident run. Should you sign her up for an organized sports team?

It's tempting: Opportunities abound to start preschoolers in many sports, even at very young ages, and social pressure to sign kids up early can be intense. But just because your child is coordinated or fast doesn't necessarily mean she's emotionally or mentally ready for a team sport or an instructional class. Watch a little-tot soccer game and you're apt to see a child or two off picking dandelions and another in tears on the sidelines. Before considering a team sport, ask yourself some basic questions:
Is my child ready to follow rules and attend regular practices? (Not likely at 3.)Can she accept coaching from another adult? (Following detailed instructions and modifying behavior is very hard for most 3-year-olds.)Is she ready for competition? (Few preschoolers even understand the idea of competing, and when parents view activities this way, it can add up to a lot of pressure and not much fun.)Can she focus for an entire game? (As you've no doubt noticed, a 3-year-old's attention span is still very short.)

Most 3-year-olds aren't up for the complexities of team sports or classes just yet. Jumping in at this age could frustrate your child and turn her off of organized sports. Right now, physical play is all about running and jumping, throwing and catching. Clambering on the playground or playing ball with you allows her to develop these important physical skills, too. Free, unstructured play is fun and low-key, but it still teaches kids about making rules, negotiation, and conflict resolution.
If a little structure helps organize your day, look into kiddie gyms or gymnastics classes that emphasize free play while helping kids practice basic coordination, like how to do a forward roll. Enjoying movement is the best foundation for an active life.

GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg


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Sunday, 16 July 2017

Your 3-year-olds mastery of speech

Using your words" is a pretty powerful thing for your 3-year-old. His mastery of speech means he can now clearly express what he wants. That's huge! And words can also ward off bad behavior. For example, instead of walking over and grabbing a toy away from another child, your preschooler is now able to approach and ask, "What are you doing?" or, "Can I try that?" Sometimes kids need our help rehearsing these important social scripts. 




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It takes time for your child to learn how to describe what he wants to do or have someone else do. He's depending on you to model social scripts for him. For example, every time you say, "Excuse me" before you interrupt a conversation, your child picks up on the idea that this is a way to gently break in without barging in. You probably already provide lots of these scripts without realizing it:
"Can I play, too?" teaches how to join an activity."Jack, ask Tad if you can try his tricycle" teaches how to ask for a turn.
"Say thank you for the treat" teaches how to express gratitude."How about if you pour and I hold the bucket?" models how to divide up work."That makes me sad (or mad)" shows ways of expressing emotion other than pow!


GOOD RESOURCE
The Pregnant Mom' by Dr. William Rudolf- http://amzn.to/2gOygOg